MadAveGroup

  1. As a marketer, you may look for feedback and advice from senior members of your team, the trades, social media groups, or even a personal mentor. But, after reading this post, we encourage you to think back to one of your earliest sources of wisdom - your dad.

    In celebration of Father’s Day, we asked a few members of the MadAveGroup staff to share some of the business-related lessons their fathers imparted.


    April Rietzke / Director, Marketing Management

    “My dad had lots of advice for me growing up. The thought that sticks with me most is ‘a job worth doing is worth doing well.’ He gave work his all, and he’s the reason I’ll work late to get something completed as it should be. He’s why I push through when I’m faced with challenges.”

    April’s dad, Bill Zitzman, is a retired tool and die maker who was with Chrysler for 20 years.


    Steve Evert / EVP of Operations

    Steve recalls two lessons that have had a big effect on how he approaches life. “When I was a little kid, my dad said, ‘He who hesitates is lost.’ That sentence has made more of an impact on me than any other I’ve heard. It’s stuck in the back of my brain ever since.”

    The elder Evert also reminded his son that “’the world doesn’t owe you a living.’ It was his way of saying you’re responsible for your own lot in life and be grateful for anything you receive.”

    Steve’s dad - also a Steve Evert - is a semi-retired commercial tire sales rep and entrepreneur.


    Gwen Brassell / Marketing Specialist

    “If you’re on time, you’re late. Be early or don’t be there at all.”

    Gwen says she still carries her dad’s words with her to this day and applies them to her work. “I’m always early for in-person or Zoom client meetings because I constantly hear my dad’s reminder in my head.”

    Terry Brassell, Gwen’s dad, is a Regional Sales Manager at Silverback Supply.


    Cassandra Evans / Creative Consultant

    “My dad always pushed the value of a great education,” said Cassandra. “When I was in high school, I mentioned my interest in marketing and he became my biggest advocate. My dad set up personal meetings with college professors, went on campus tours with me and even attended my orientation.

    “Then, the constant learning opportunities began. My dad would point out weak TV commercials, point-of-purchase signs and billboards and say with a smile, “That’s why a good education is so important. If I ever find out you do bad marketing like that, I’ll call your job myself and tell them to fire you.”

    Cassandra’s dad, Paul Kaegi, is an AVP & Sr. Credit Analyst at Premier Bank. 


    Account Executive Victor Tehensky’s dad, Joe, reminded him to “always be a leader, not a follower.”

    “Only look up and forward, not backwards. You’re not going that way.” That’s the advice Jim O’Bryant gave his daughter Susan Harris, our Fulfillment Manager.

    And CEO Jerry Brown’s dad urged his son to “always question everything. Don’t blindly follow or implement something if it doesn’t make sense to you.”


    How did your dad encourage your business or marketing goals? Did any of his advice change the course of your life? Is it still a foundational idea for you today?

    And what ideas are you passing along to your kids or the younger members of your team? Tell us about the insight you share on our Facebook or LinkedIn pages.

    Happy Father’s Day.

  2. Q: Why did the chicken cross the road?

    A: To avoid running into the billboard.

    Like many forms of domestic fowl, you, too, may consider marketing and advertising content to be an interruption. It gets in the way of what you really want to watch, read or hear.

    You may try to avoid ads by reaching for the remote during commercial breaks or even moving to the other side of the street, as members of the poultry community so often do.

    Those are two of the reasons we work to make marketing funny.

    The Benefits of Humor

    Humor encourages people to actively engage with marketing content rather than turning away. It also increases the likelihood that the audience will enjoy their encounter with the brand. When they do, they may be willing to look at the company's future posts or listen more intently to their next radio spot.

    Jim Hausfeld agrees. He's an advertising agency Creative Director who heard our Humor On Hold while judging an awards show. Jim wrote, “Superbly written copy and extremely dry humor that was a perfect match for what could've been a dull subject. I laughed out loud at points, and when a caller starts with that reaction, it's a great way to start a conversation.”

    We create Humor On Hold through BusinessVoice, our Caller Experience Marketing agency. We use it to turn the negative of holding into a memorable, positively surprising moment for callers all over the country. Listen to the sample in the video below.

     

    More Than Laughs

    When applied skillfully, humor can make content about products and services more palatable to an audience. “The On Hold Marketing scripts BusinessVoice creates are not only funny, but also informative,” wrote Steve Eaton, CEO of Med-Line Express Services. “They provide valuable information about specific aspects of my operation that some may not be aware of. In the 15+ years I’ve been in business, this is by far the best marketing money I have spent.”

    This five-spot radio campaign we created for Ray's Trash in Indianapolis informs listeners of just about everything the company does, but with a humorous tone. 

     


    Using Humor Online 

    What about your company's online videos? Wouldn't it be great if more people watched, shared and remembered them?

    Incorporating humor can help you meet those goals, while still leaving plenty of room to inform and persuade. Take a look at this quick capabilities video we created for Binkelman Corporation. It's the first in a series.


    Here are a few of the comments LinkedIn users have posted about that video:

    • "I. Love. This. Period." - Jeff S.

    • "What a fantastic corporate video. Taking something that could potentially be stale to listen to and making it fun - not to mention memorable - is genius! Nicely done." - Amy J.

    • "Love it! Great video. We need more creative work like this today." - Kerrigan Q.


    The video above is a self-promotional piece we created. It won a 2021 Gold ADDY and a Judge's Choice Award. (Read the details.) Here's why Denver agency owner Jennifer Hohn singled out the work as award-worthy:

    "It's one thing to land just one joke, but to be able to stretch this joke over a minute and 42 seconds is a pretty huge feat, and this video does that brilliantly. Really well done. Really strong stream-of-consciousness copywriting. Loved how it's something that you don't see every day. It's always fun to see work that stretches your mind and makes you laugh a little bit."

    Before you as a marketer can hope to have a deeper conversation with prospective customers, you must first attract and keep their attention. Working with our team to put a humorous spin on what you do shows your potential buyers that you'll be fun to work with because you don't take yourself too seriously and that you make the effort to create content that people enjoy.

    When you're ready to stake out your unique position in the marketplace with humor, drop me a line at scott.greggory@MadAveGroup.com.

    For many more Humor On Hold samples and reviews, visit our dedicated humor page at BusinessVoice.com.

     

  3. As in the recent past, there were certain commercials that aired during this year's Super Bowl that looked like they cost a lot more money to produce than others. They were the spots that featured several celebrities or many locations or loads of computer-generated effects.

    But I found those spots to be the least effective at communicating a memorable message. They came off as all flash and no substance. ("Look at how many famous faces we hired!") Or they were so quickly edited or crammed with visual elements that they were tough to follow.

    Naturally, during the biggest television event of the year, advertisers want their commercials to stand out even more than usual, but within the game environment, the glitzy spots seemed to cancel out each other.

    As a contrast, imagine a Super Bowl commercial featuring a stagnant shot of one person reading quirky copy against a white background. If well executed, the spot would pop against all the others if only for its simplicity and divergent tone.

    A Few Takeaways

    1) When producing your advertising and buying media, think context. Is the landscape you'll be participating in loud and fast-paced? If so, consider taking a soft and slow approach with your content.

    2) Spending lots of money on the creation of your advertising doesn't guarantee success. Good ideas well executed can trump a big production budget.

    3) Strive to deliver value to your audience. Don't leave them wondering, "what was the point of that commercial?" Make them happy they invested their time and attention in your message.

  4. My wife Amy and I were shopping for our first house in 1993.

    Our Realtor, Brian, walked us through a few homes during the first two weekends of our search. Then, on our third trip, he showed us six houses in just one afternoon.

    By that night, I couldn’t keep any of the homes straight.

    In my mind, I put the perfect kitchen from house number one next to the great room in house five. I moved the ugly fireplace from the brick two-story into the den of the sprawling ranch.

    During our tours, I had to take in a lot of information with very little context. I was seeing the homes and their features for the first time in relatively quick succession. And since I couldn’t keep them separated, I wasn’t able to make a confident buying decision.

    Brian called the next day.

    “I think you should see the fourth house again,” he said. “It has everything you’re looking for.”

    We agreed to another tour. But this time, we looked only at the fourth house.

    As we walked through that second time, everything came into focus. I was able to concentrate on the amenities and details. I could see the advantages of owning that home.

    I was also amazed at how I missed all those benefits during the first tour.

    We bought the house, started our family there and made it our home for nine years.

    The Advertising Equivalent

    Your potential customers live in a cluttered media marketplace. There’s a lot to see and hear, and there are countless others clamoring for their attention. It’s no wonder your message could get lost, forgotten or confused with that of other brands.

    So, do what Brian the Realtor eventually did: help your audience focus. Make it easier for them to see - and remember - you and your message.

    A few suggestions:

    Commit to your channels. For instance, don’t air radio spots for a week and then bolt. Stick with your chosen media at least long enough for the audience to think of you as THE provider of the product or service you offer.

    Limit your message in each channel to one key point. Make it easy for your prospective customers to associate your name with your primary product, service or benefit.

    Introduce other services slowly. Resist any urge to tell your audience about everything you sell right now. Wait until you own your keyword or phrase before giving your audience more to remember.

    Keep it simple. Whether you’re developing an online, outdoor or broadcast advertising campaign, don’t overwhelm your audience with content. Use simple language. Include plenty of white space in your visual ads to easily draw attention to your most important point. You might even consider adding silence or “a little room” between the audio elements of your radio, TV and video messages. That quick “break” may give your listeners the time they need to absorb your key points.

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  5. What will 2021 bring for marketers? How will channels and technology change? Could we see new concepts emerge or will we re-discover tried and true foundational ideas?

    I asked a few MadAveGroup staffers to look into the future and offer their thoughts.

    Gwen Brassell / Marketing Specialist
    I predict the rise of short-term content marketing. As Generation Z progresses into adulthood, marketers will need to adapt to that audience’s shorter attention spans. Platforms like Snapchat, TikTok and Instagram offer companies an opportunity to create that short-term content and engage those users.

    (Visit the MadAve Marketing Management website.) 

    The traditional ways of marketing are changing. Companies need to create unique experiences for their customers. Instead of placing a print media buy, consider investing in influencer marketing. If your Facebook post engagement has fallen flat, shift some funds toward creating powerful video marketing to tell your story. Whichever method you choose, I urge you to take creative risks to attract a new audience.

    Don Miller / Director of TouchStone Digital
    Once we emerge from the pandemic, the restaurant and entertainment industries will see a huge boost in traffic. People will be anxious to spend money in these sectors, but those businesses will still need to ramp up their marketing and creativity to stay competitive and stand out from the crowd.

    Also, I’d like to see smaller local businesses take advantage of the e-commerce economy, while still being hometown destinations that care about their customers and community and act accordingly.

    (Visit the new TouchStone Digital website.)

    Every local company should be using Google My Business (GMB) to make sure they’re put in front of customers when a need for their business arises. GMB helps a company show up in Google search engine results and populates Google Maps and other maps. That’s important because customers are usually ready to make a purchase or take some other action after that search.

    Lou Perlaky / Marketing Specialist
    I predict that in 2021 data and analysis will be more important than ever. Due to the pandemic and remaining uncertainty, many industries are dealing with a whole new world and they may still not be sure of how their customers will respond to the new rules, from reduced hours and customer capacity to smaller inventories and less foot traffic. In the past marketers have used historical data to predict future trends. Now that we’re all in new territory we need to use our data carefully to guide strategic decisions.

    It’s a good time to review your marketing, digital plan, web goals and strategies. If the pandemic affected your 2020 goals, do you need to reset your expectations for 2021? Are the goals you thought you’d have for this year still realistic and attainable or do you need to make adjustments?

    Ready for a conversation about your marketing in 2021 and beyond? Call us at 419/473-9000.

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